True or False? Your dog has a special identifier that is the equivalent of a fingerprint for humans.

 

According to the American Kennel Club, the answer to the question is TRUEEvery dog’s nose print is unique. No two dogs have the same.  Every bump and ridge is their own.

 

This is a true statement for another family pet — your cat!

When you pick up a camera which eye do you use to look through the viewfinder? Most people use their right eye. I would too, except, I can’t. My right eye is “lazy”.

 

At the age of 16, I went to the Bureau of Motor Vehicles to get my driver license. I was given an eye exam. The only letter on the eye chart that I could see with my right eye was the letter E — in part because I knew that was the letter at the top of the chart. When I was unable to distinguish any of the other letters with my right eye I was asked by the administrator, “What are you? Blind?”

 

That question echoed in my mind. I felt defeated and disabled, limited by my vision.

 

Maybe this is why, when I look through the lens, I am truly amazed by the details. It is the face that draws me in. I see every color in a pet’s eyes, every wisp of fur, and the uniqueness of every animal.

 

To this day I have a choice to make. I can say, “If only I had two good eyes then I would be a better photographer.” Or I can say, “I only need one good eye to look through my camera –and that is what I have!”

 

It’s in those moments of taking a picture that I celebrate what I can see, every detail of God’s creation, and I am thankful for one good eye.

 

My “vision” is limitless.

 

Our Charlie Girl is on a grain-free diet. So, I wanted to create a treat that would be both healthy for her and easy for me.

 

  • 1 cup white rice flour*
  • 1 medium banana, smashed
  • ¼ cup peanut butter**
  • 3 T. water
Directions:
  1. Mix all ingredients together. Add more water or flour as needed.
  2. Roll out dough to ¼ inch thick on a lightly floured surface. Use a cookie cutter to cut into desired shapes or use a bottle cap to create smaller treats.
  3. Place dog treats on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake for 15 – 25 minutes. Time varies depending on the size of the treat.
  4. Allow to cool completely before storing in a paper bag. The dog treats will soften if stored in an airtight container.

 

This makes approximately 60 treats. These will last for a couple weeks — although, if it were up to our Charlie Girl, they would be gone in a day. She loves them! As with any treat, give them sparingly. You can freeze some for later.

 

*Please note: I used white rice flour but, for other grain-free options, you can use quinoa, bean, or oat flour (or a combination).

**The best peanut butter is raw with no added sugar or salt. Make sure the peanut butter does not  contain Xylitol (a type of sweetener that is toxic to dogs).